Changing Your Name and Gender in Oregon

Oregon is on the move to become a more transgender and non-binary friendly state.

In 2016, an Oregon judge allowed Jamie Shupe, a person who identified as non-binary, to change their identity to a neutral third gender. The judge’s decision to allow a non-binary gender is widely believed to be the first of its kind in the United States.

After this decision, Oregon gained momentum in creating a more streamlined process for those wishing to change their name and gender. Changing one’s name and gender previously was a complicated process. It often differed from county to county, and could not always be accomplished alone.

However, starting in 2017, the State of Oregon Judicial Department began providing statewide forms for both adults and minors who want to change their name and/or gender. The petition allows the applicant to decide whether they want to identify as male, female, or non-binary. The forms provide instructions for filling out a petition, as well as the cost and where it can be filed. Those forms can be found here: http://www.courts.oregon.gov/programs/family/forms/Pages/name-sex-change.aspx

No court order is necessary to change a gender indicator.

Additionally, as of July, 2017, the Oregon DMV also allows residents to change their gender marker to male, female, or a non-binary designation: “X.” To change a marker, an applicant will need to go to the DMV, and turn in a completed application with the desired indicator marked. They also are required to pay the renewal or replacement fee for their identification card. No court order is necessary to change a gender indicator. Please note that in order to change a name on a driver’s license or ID card, an applicant will need proof of a legal name change. One method of proof is to have a court order showing the legal name change. Forms and information can be found here: http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/Pages/DriverID/chg_gender_designation.aspx

For those born in Oregon, there is also an administrative option for updating Oregon birth records to reflect accurate gender identity. This new option became available in January, 2018. It allows a one-time gender and name change without having to go through the courts. An applicant may request to be listed as male, female, or non-binary. An applicant will need to submit a notarized document, as well as a fee. For more information see: http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/Pages/rules.aspx

With these changes, Oregon remains on the forefront of transgender issues. If you would like help in changing your name and/ or gender, contact a family law attorney.

Emily Clark is a litigator at Samuels Yoelin Kantor, with her practice centered around family law. Her passion is helping families navigate all the various obstacles they may face. Her practice focuses on domestic relations, probate, and business transactions.

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