U.S. Treasury Releases Paycheck Protection Program Loan Application, Additional Information

On March 31, 2020, the U.S. Treasury Department released the initial loan application for borrowers under the “Paycheck Protection Program,” a Small Business Administration (SBA) forgivable loan program that is part of the CARES Act passed by Congress last week.  In addition, the Treasury Department provided borrowers with an “Information Sheet” for borrowers under the program.

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COVID-19: Changes in Federal Tax Law You Need to Know

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the last few weeks have seen an unprecedented series of legislative actions by Congress, as well as a number of significant administrative actions by the Internal Revenue Service. Here is a brief synopsis of federal tax extensions and changes due to COVID-19.

Initially, the IRS only offered a payment deadline extension in response to COVID-19, but after much pressure, the IRS in response has instead provided much more comprehensive relief to mostly taxpayers in the U.S.

All taxpayers refers to: individuals, trusts, estates, (some) partnerships, associations, companies (including LLCs), corporations, nonprofits, and more that have a filing date of April 15, 2020.

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Congress Passes CARES Act, Adds Forgivable Loan Program for Small Businesses

Late in the evening on March 25th, the United States Senate passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) by a vote of 96-0. The House passed the Act on Friday, March 27th. President Trump is expected to sign the Act very soon. While SamuelsLawBlog.com will provide additional details on the CARES Act in the coming days, here are additional details of the Act’s significant $349 billion expansion of the Small Business Administration’s (“SBA”) Section 7(a) loan program.

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Senate Bill Provision Offers Hope to Small Business

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States Senate is currently debating S. 3548, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or the “CARES Act.” It is estimated that the CARES Act could provide a $1 to $2 Trillion stimulus in economic aid to both businesses and workers.

While multifaceted, one provision sets forth a significant benefit to small businesses that can apply for forgivable loans from the Small Business Administration (SBA).

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Carrie Fisher: Some Early Thoughts on Her Estate

May the Force be with you Carrie – you were one of the brightest stars.

The entertainment world lost an iconic legend today. Carrie Fisher, best known for her role as Princess Leia Organa in the Star Wars films, passed away this morning after suffering a heart attack on December 23, 2016, while on a flight from London to Los Angeles. In addition to her Star Wars role, Ms. Fisher starred in many other films, and also authored several books, plays, and screen plays. She recently published her autobiography, The Princess Diarist.

From a legal perspective, it is far too early to analyze Ms. Fisher’s estate to any degree. However, one can make a number of observations.

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Win Olympic Gold – And Pay for It

Every time the Olympics come around, there’s dozens of articles and posts about how Olympic medals are subject to income tax. The IRS considers all prize winnings, such as gambling or game show prizes, to be income and thus taxable. Olympic medals get lumped into this group (as do the cash bonuses they come with). Luckily for the athletes, their medals are valued at the time they are earned, essentially the value of the materials. A gold medal from Rio is estimated to be worth $564, a silver medal is estimated at $305, and a bronze medal has little intrinsic value. Since Olympic medalists generally treat their sport as a profession the value of the medal and related bonuses are likely to be offset with a deduction for the significant expenses that most athletes incur.

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Bitcoin – Is It Really Money?

Recently, a Florida judge dismissed a money laundering charge against a man who sold $2,000 worth of bitcoin to an undercover agent who claimed he was using the bitcoin to purchase stolen credit card numbers. The judge held that bitcoin is not money and therefore it does not fall within Florida’s money laundering statute. While leaving the door wide open for the Florida legislature to regulate bitcoin and other virtual currency, the judge says that trying to regulate bitcoin using a statutory scheme regulating money is “like fitting a square peg in a round hole.”

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The Estate of Prince – Let’s Go Crazy!

Early reports tell us that the late musician Prince died without a will. Therefore, Minnesota “intestacy” statutes (i.e. statutes govern estates of decedents dying without a will) are going to control the administration of Prince’s estate. In a legal petition filed on April 26, 2016, by Prince’s sister, Tyka Nelson, Ms. Nelson stated that she did not know of the existence of a will signed by Prince. Because of this, no person currently has the legal right to act on behalf of his estate.

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