– Est. –
1927

Senate Approves Additional Funds for Paycheck Protection Program

On Tuesday, April 21, 2020, the U.S. Senate passed H.R. 266, the “Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act” by voice vote. The bill appropriates an additional $310 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), which exhausted its initial $349 billion in funding within two weeks of Congress’ passage of the CARES Act. The bill also provided $60 billion for community banks and smaller lenders, $75 billion for hospitals, $25 billion for testing, and $60 billion for emergency disaster loans and grants.

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Where’s My Stimulus Check?

The IRS sent out the first wave of stimulus payments this  past week to around 80 million Americans. In order to speed up the process, the IRS has prioritized sending payments to Americans that have previously submitted their direct deposit information with the agency. Those that have not authorized a direct deposit account with the IRS will receive their stimulus payment in paper check form. However, the IRS estimates that it only has the capacity to mail out 5 million checks a week, so many Americans will not receive their payment until likely August or later.

Based on the income level eligibility requirements, at least 90% of Americans should qualify for at least some amount of stimulus payment. If you think you should have received your stimulus payment by now, here are several reasons why the IRS has delayed your payment.

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Real Estate

COVID-19 Federal, State, and Local Prohibitions Against Non-Payment Evictions

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has encouraged Oregon State Governor Kate Brown to issue a Stay at Home order effective statewide in an effort to curb the spread of the virus. As a result, many individuals are out of work, causing emotional stress and financial hardship.

Federal, state, and local governments have each taken action in an attempt to reduce financial stress on residential and commercial tenants.

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”). In Section 4024, the CARES Act imposed immediate protections for some residential tenants. Specifically, the CARES Act placed a federal eviction moratorium for nonpayment of rent on covered properties. Landlords are temporarily prohibited from filing new eviction actions for nonpayment of rent as a result of COVID-19, as well as prohibited from charging late fees or other penalties for tenants’ nonpayment of rent. It is critical for landlord to review the definition of covered properties, and confer with a knowledgeable attorney is they are unsure whether they own a covered property.

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Treasury Department Releases Additional Guidance on Paycheck Protection Program

On April 8, 2020, the U. S. Treasury Department updated its “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)” guidance on the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) that is being administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA). While this document was previously issued by the Treasury Department, it has been updated to address some of the questions that borrowers and lenders have raised as lenders have been inundated with applications for the forgivable loans under the PPP. Congress is currently considering allocating another $200 to $250 billion to the PPP.

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Contracts, Coronavirus, and Force Majeure: How Does COVID-19 Affect Contract Obligations?

When I was a first year law student I learned about contract formation, contractual obligations, and breach of contract. We also learned about a term called Force Majeure. You may have recently seen the term. 

Force Majeure is a French term that means something along the lines of “superior or irresistible force”, but it is also a term used in conjunction with contract law. In the context of contract law, force majeure is an uncontrollable event that prevents a party from fulfilling their contractual obligations. Force majeure is commonly thought of as a provision included in the terms and conditions of a contract. But, because “uncontrollable events which prevent a party from fulfilling their contractual obligations” seldom occur, especially on a wide spread basis, force majeure provisions aren’t invoked very often.

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How to Prepare for Bankruptcy

This sudden economic downturn will cause a large number of individuals and corporate entity debtors to consider bankruptcy in order to get a better handle on their financial situation. While many associate declaring bankruptcy as an admission of failure or destitution, bankruptcy can actually offer debtors a path toward recovering from a devastating financial situation. When considering whether bankruptcy is the right option for your situation, it is essential to have a basic understanding of how bankruptcy works and the initial actions you should take should you need to proceed with bankruptcy. 

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U.S. Treasury Releases Paycheck Protection Program Loan Application, Additional Information

On March 31, 2020, the U.S. Treasury Department released the initial loan application for borrowers under the “Paycheck Protection Program,” a Small Business Administration (SBA) forgivable loan program that is part of the CARES Act passed by Congress last week.  In addition, the Treasury Department provided borrowers with an “Information Sheet” for borrowers under the program. 

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Multnomah County Presiding Judge Issues Child Custody and Parenting Time Orders During COVID 19 Pandemic

Last week we wrote about the State Family Law Advisory Committee (SFLAC) recommendations for custody and parenting time issues that may arise during this COVID 19 pandemic. Since that post, those recommendations have been adopted in a Court Order as of March 27, 2020 issued by Presiding Judge Stephen Bushong and Presiding Family Law Judge Susan Svetkey of the Multnomah County Circuit Court. This Order applies to any person who has a court-ordered parenting plan in a Multnomah County Circuit Court case that is still in effect.

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COVID-19: Changes in Federal Tax Law You Need to Know

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the last few weeks have seen an unprecedented series of legislative actions by Congress, as well as a number of significant administrative actions by the Internal Revenue Service. Here is a brief synopsis of federal tax extensions and changes due to COVID-19.

Initially, the IRS only offered a payment deadline extension in response to COVID-19, but after much pressure, the IRS in response has instead provided much more comprehensive relief to mostly taxpayers in the U.S. 

All taxpayers refers to: individuals, trusts, estates, (some) partnerships, associations, companies (including LLCs), corporations, nonprofits, and more that have a filing date of April 15, 2020.

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