Notice and Comment Period for Proposed Corporate Activity Tax (“CAT”) Rules Ends

Time marches on and the time to comment on several of the Oregon Department of Revenue’s Corporate Activity Tax (“CAT”) rules ends today, May 26 at 5pm. While the Oregon State Bar Taxation Section did not officially comment on the rules, three attorneys, including Samuels Yoelin Kantor, LLP’s Valerie Sasaki, did submit comments on the math problem that is Proposed OAR 150-317-1200. Essentially, the CAT is only imposed on a taxpayer’s Oregon receipts. The question of how to calculate that though, has led to what we believe are some unintended, flawed results for taxpayers that have costs and labor concentrated relative to certain income streams.

While the section did not officially comment, several folks whose names don’t appear on the final comments contributed to discussing the comments and accompanying examples, which you can find below as downloads. We are proud to practice as a part of a community that values good tax policy, even in difficult times.

View comments on OAR 150-317-1200 and examples.

Valerie Sasaki specializes in jurisdictional tax consulting, working closely with Fortune 50 companies involved in audits before the Oregon or Washington Departments of Revenue. She also works with business owners on tax, business, and estate planning issues in Oregon or Southwest Washington.

COVID-19: Changes in Federal Tax Law You Need to Know

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the last few weeks have seen an unprecedented series of legislative actions by Congress, as well as a number of significant administrative actions by the Internal Revenue Service. Here is a brief synopsis of federal tax extensions and changes due to COVID-19.

Federal Filing and Payment Deadlines Extended

Initially, the IRS only offered a payment deadline extension in response to COVID-19. However, after much pressure, the IRS in response has instead provided much more comprehensive relief to mostly taxpayers in the U.S.

All taxpayers refers to: individuals, trusts, estates, (some) partnerships, associations, companies (including LLCs), corporations, nonprofits, and more that have a filing date of April 15, 2020.

  • For all taxpayers who are required to file a federal income tax return and/or submit a federal income tax payment for the 2019 tax year, due on April 15, 2020, the due date for both filing and paying is extended to July 15, 2020. This applies to all taxpayers regardless of the amount of their federal tax obligation.
  • This applies to all filers of Forms 1040, 1040-SR, 1040-NR, 1040-NR-EZ, 1040-PR, 1040-SS, 1041, 1041-N, 1041-QFT, 1120, 1120-C, 1120-F, 1120-FSC, 1120-H, 1120-L, 1120-ND, 1120-PC, 1120-POL, 1120-REIT, 1120-RIC, 1120-SF, 8960 and 8991.
  • For self-employed taxpayers, relief is also provided for making federal estimated income tax payments.
  • The period of April 15, 2020 through July 15, 2020 is considered disregarded for the purposes of calculation of any interest, penalty, or addition to tax for failure to file the income tax returns or pay the income tax owed. Interest, penalties and any additions of tax will begin to accrue again on July 16, 2020.
  • No extension is provided for the payment or deposit of any other type of federal tax- including federal estate and gift tax.
  • Important to note that any taxpayer returns that were due on March 16, 2020, which include Form 1065, 1065-B, Form 1066, and Form 1120-S, are not included in any of the COVID-19 extensions for both filing and payment. However, any timely filed extensions will still extend the due date six months as normal.
  • For fiscal year taxpayers, if their federal income tax return for the fiscal year ending during 2019 is due on April 15, 2020, whether that is the original due date or the extension date, the taxpayer’s filing due date is postponed to July 15, 2020.

For taxpayers that qualify for extension, no additional form is required for the July 15, 2020.  Any additional extension beyond July 15, 2020 will require filing Form 4868 as usually required.

Business Tax Credits

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Act which eases compliance burdens on businesses. Additional business credits were then signed into law through the Coronavirus, Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES) on March 27.

Payroll Sick Leave Credit

The Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) requires private employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide 80 hours of paid sick time to employees who are unable to work for virus-related reasons (certain exceptions may apply to less than 50-employee businesses). The pay is up to $511 per day with a $5,110 overall limit for each employee directly affected by the virus and up to $200 per day with a $2,000 overall limit for an employee providing care for someone with the virus.

The employer is allowed to receive a tax credit against their 6.2{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} of the Social Security (OASDI) payroll tax (commonly known as the Railroad Retirement tax). This credit amount tracks to the per-employee limits described above. This credit can also be increased by both the amount of expenses in connection with a qualified health plan if the expenses are excludible from employee income, and the employer’s share of the payroll Medicare hospital tax imposed on any payments required under the EPSLA. Any credit amounts earned in excess of the 6.2{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} Railroad Retirement tax are refundable. The credit applies to wages paid in a period beginning no later than April 2, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2020.

Self-Employed Sick Leave Credit

Self-employed persons also qualify for a sick leave credit.  The credit treats the self-employed person as both the employer and employee for credit purposes. The $5,110 and $2,000 limits as described above in EPSLA, also apply here unless the self-employed person has insufficient self-employment income based on a formula. The credit applies to wages paid in a period beginning no later than April 2, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2020.

Payroll Family Leave Credit

The Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide both paid and unpaid leave. This leave occurs when an employee must take care of a minor child due to a COVID-19 related emergency. The first 10 days can be unpaid, but then paid leave is required, based on the employee’s pay rate and pay hours. The leave cannot exceed $200 a day or $10,000 total per employee.

The corresponding tax credit functions substantially similar to the payroll tax credit described above. The credit is against the same 6.2{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} Railroad Retirement Tax, and tracks to the $200 and $10,000 dollars employee limits described above.

Self-Employed Family Leave Credit

The Act also provided the self-employed a similar refundable income tax credit for family leave. The self-employed person is treated as both employer and employee for purposes of the credit. The credit is subject to a $10,000 limit, and may be reduced if there is insufficient self-employment income determined by formula.

Wage Exemption

Any wages paid as required sick leave payments for either EPSLA or EFMLEA are not considered wages for purposes of the employer’s 6.2{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} portion of the payroll tax, again often referred to as the Railroad Retirement Tax.

Employee Retention Credit for Employers

For eligible employers who have their operations fully or partially suspended as a result of government order, or who have experienced a greater than 50{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} reduction in quarterly receipts, measured on a year-over-year basis, the provision provides a refundable payroll tax credit for 50{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} of wages to certain employees. Employers receiving Small Business Interruption Loans do not qualify for the credit. The qualifying wages depend on whether the employer has an average number of full-time employees in 2019 of 100 or fewer, if so, all employee wages are eligible.  If over 100 full-time employees, only the wages of furloughed employees or faced a reduction of hours as a result of employer’s closure or reduced gross receipts are eligible for the credit.

Other Changes in the Federal Tax Code

Recovery Rebates for Individuals

The CARES Act provides individuals with a refundable credit against income taxes they owe for the 2020 tax year equal to $1,200 ($2,400 for joint filers), not to exceed the tax liability for the year. Any taxpayer that has qualifying income (earned income, social security, and/or pension income), taxable income greater than zero, and gross income greater than the standard deduction, then the taxpayer is entitled to a refundable credit of at least $600 ($1,200 for joint filers), plus $500 per qualifying child. The phase-out begins at $75,000 ($150,000 for joint filers).

Payroll Tax Deferment

The CARES Act also allows employers and self-employed individuals to defer paying the employer portion of certain payroll taxes through the end of 2020. Half of the deferred amount of payroll taxes will be due December 31, 2021, and the remaining half will be due December 31, 2022. Any taxpayer receiving a Small Business Act Loan are excluded from this deferral program.

Deductibility of Interest Expenses Temporarily Increased

The Cares Act temporarily and retroactively increases the limitation of the deductibility of interest expense under Code Sec. 163(j)(1) from 30{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} to 50{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} for tax years 2019 and 2020.

Temporary Repeal of Taxable Income Limitation for Net Operating Losses (NOLs)

The Cares Act temporarily removes the taxable income limitation to allow an NOL to fully offset income. This will apply to the 2018, 2019 and 2020 tax years, allowing taxpayers to file amended returns and receive refunds for those that qualify.

Net Operating Loss (NOL) Rule Changes

Any losses arising in 2018, 2019, and 2020 can be carried back to the five preceding years. For any NOLs arising in tax years before 2021, those carrybacks may offset 100 percent of income for the prior 5 years. An amended return may be filed to claim the benefit back to the 2013 tax year.

Cancellation of Indebtedness Income

For small businesses that receive certain loans from the government under the CARES act, any such forgiveness of the loan granted to these taxpayers shall not be considered income.

More Changes Likely to Come

As the situation develops, we will continue to document additional changes made at the federal level.

Michael D. Walker is a business, tax and estate planning attorney who has worked with individuals and small to medium-sized businesses for nearly 30 years. A careful listener, Michael skillfully guides his clients to meet the wide variety of legal challenges they face in our current complex world.

Nicholas Rogers - Attorney

 

Nicholas D. Rogers joins SYK Estate Planning and Taxation practice with a passion for helping individuals, small business and nonprofits. His practice includes a focus on estate planning, federal and state tax controversy, business formation and planning, as well as trust and estate administration.

Mnuchin Announces Deadline to File Extended by Tweet

In a tweet at about 10 am Eastern Time this morning, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin announced “We are moving Tax Day from April 15 to July 15. All taxpayers and businesses will have this additional time to file and make payments without interest or penalties.”

This has not posted to the Internal Revenue Service or Treasury Department newsroom at this time. Internal Revenue Code Section 6081 gives the treasury secretary the authority to grant a reasonable extension of time for filing any return. IRC 6161 allows the treasury secretary the authority to extend payment of taxes for periods less than six months, which Secretary Mnuchin did on Tuesday, March 17.

Oregon is, per a statement on the Revenews listserv yesterday, still considering whether and how to conform to these extensions.

Valerie Sasaki specializes in jurisdictional tax consulting, working closely with Fortune 50 companies involved in audits before the Oregon or Washington Departments of Revenue. She also works with business owners on tax, business, and estate planning issues in Oregon or Southwest Washington.

Extension: 90 Day Extension to Pay Taxes

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin announced today that individual taxpayers will now get a 90 day extension of time (through what Excel tells me is Tuesday, July 14, 2020) to pay 2019 income taxes, up to $1 million owed. Corporate filers will get the same period of time to pay up to $10 million in taxes owed.  During the period of time from April through July 14, taxpayers will not be subject to additional interest and penalties on amounts due for 2019. Individuals and businesses will still have to file their income tax returns by April 15, unless they file a request for extension. As usual, if taxpayers are getting a refund, they may not want to extend the deadline to file their income taxes. Secretary Mnuchin said that the delay will free $300 billion of liquidity in the economy.

The Oregon Department of Revenue earlier stated that it will automatically connect to the extended filing and payment dates for individuals. The IRS has not yet ruled on whether it will extend the deadline for 2020 first quarter estimated tax payments. This extension is in addition to the proposed $850 billion stimulus package that is before the Senate.

For more information, see Bloomburg’s article on this.

Valerie Sasaki specializes in jurisdictional tax consulting, working closely with Fortune 50 companies involved in audits before the Oregon or Washington Departments of Revenue. She also works with business owners on tax, business, and estate planning issues in Oregon or Southwest Washington.

Think about 2018 Taxes Now!

We’ve had a lot of questions from clients about the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs act on normal, working Americans. IRS did a clumsy job with implementation, although in their defense the TCJA probably raised more questions than it answered. Also, one of the most surprising effects will be felt by taxpayers who live in high tax jurisdictions and who itemize their deductions.

A combination of factors may mean a higher bill.

Three things are conspiring against us to create a perfect storm of annoyance and large tax payments.

  • First, IRS came out with new withholding tables that may have significantly under-withheld for a large part of 2018. The General Accounting Office says this snafu will have an impact on approximately 73{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} of US taxpayers.
  • Second, Oregon is a jurisdiction with a relatively high personal income tax rate. In 2018, you can only deduct $10,000 state tax (income plus property) on your income tax return if you itemize. So, if you pay $8,000 in state income tax and have $5,000 in property taxes, you can’t deduct the full $13,000 on your Federal schedule A. You can only deduct $10,000.
  • Finally, many of us did not adjust our exemptions on Form W-9 after the TCJA passed. While some folks will not be itemizing their deductions this year, due to the increase in the standard deduction, the combination of the first two factors may mean that you have a stiff bill to pay on April 15 (and not a moment sooner!!!!!).

We also wanted to encourage folks to reach out to their CPA early this year. Get your organizers completed and shoe box of receipts assembled early and to your tax preparer. We have heard from our friends who prepare personal income tax returns that the complexity of the 2018 tax season will mean that some shops don’t have enough people to do the work. If you wait too long, you may end up doing your return yourself! (I may be the only one out there who finds that entertaining).

Valerie Sasaki specializes in jurisdictional tax consulting, working closely with Fortune 50 companies involved in audits before the Oregon or Washington Departments of Revenue. She also works with business owners on tax, business, and estate planning issues in Oregon or Southwest Washington.

Oregon Shifts Heavy Equipment Personal Property Tax Burden to Contractors starting in 2019

Large and small heavy equipment rental providers throughout the state of Oregon recently scored a huge victory when Governor Brown signed HB 4139 into law earlier last month.  The new law replaces Oregon’s existing personal property tax system for heavy equipment with a 2 percent tax on every heavy equipment rental transaction starting in 2019. While many states have either eliminated personal property tax or have exempted certain manufacturing and construction businesses from ad valorem property tax, Oregon was one of the few remaining that offered no relief or reform of any kind for heavy equipment rental providers.

Critics often cited the compliance costs associated with the business personal property tax as complex and burdensome in a way that discouraged many companies from accurately reporting. The old system was a location-based tax. This means that a company would be taxed on heavy machinery it owned based on where it was sitting on January 1 of that year. Heavy equipment rental businesses often rent their equipment out all over the state and beyond. Tracking location of constantly moving equipment for tax purposes proved difficult and also created the potential of requiring companies to pay additional tax in multiple counties or states on the same equipment where assessment dates varied.

Under the new law, the location-based tax goes away and now a sales or value-added tax of 2 percent will be collected by the heavy equipment rental business at point-of-sale and remitted to the Department of Revenue. The Department is authorized to use up to 5{45ef85514356201a9665f05d22c09675e96dde607afc20c57d108fe109b047b6} of the revenue for administrative costs needed to enforce the tax. The remaining money will distribute out to the local counties based on where each rental transaction occurred. This ensures that the heavy equipment rental businesses have a much simpler system for determining the tax they owe and local counties receive revenue based on the number of heavy equipment rental transactions occur within its borders.

Many surrounding states such as California and Idaho have adopted state and local sales taxes on similar transactions. Supporters of this change say this makes Oregon more competitive in the construction market and will attract more business in general to the state.

According to Section 3 of the new law, every heavy equipment provider will need to register with the Department of Revenue by December 15 of this year to certify that they qualify for the rental tax program and exempt them from the old ad valorem property tax system. The providers will then be required to collect the rental tax on each transaction and file a return each calendar quarter to report the tax due. The change is meant to be revenue neutral, meaning that the amount of monies paid under the new system should equal to what the providers would have been paid under the old system. Section 5 states that any amount paid by a qualified heavy equipment provider that exceeds the old tax threshold will receive a refund in the amount of the excess.

While overall this new change will likely benefit both providers and local counties alike, heavy equipment rental businesses may receive more of a windfall from this change than initially planned. This is a quirk of the Oregon law that is different from other jurisdictions. Based on how the new law is worded, the providers are tasked with merely collecting and ensuring the proper amount of tax is transmitted to the Department of Revenue. The incidence of tax is on the party renting the equipment. So, the renter will remit the new tax to the equipment rental company along with the rental price, and if the amount of tax exceeds the amount “paid” under the old system, then the providers will receive a refund of any excess.

Based on the wording of the new law, it does not appear the Oregon Legislature has thought about this windfall possibility. It remains to be seen whether any modifications to the law will address this potential for abuse. We understand that the Oregon Department of Revenue is currently working on regulations to administer this new assessment.

Valerie Sasaki specializes in jurisdictional tax consulting, working closely with Fortune 50 companies involved in audits before the Oregon or Washington Departments of Revenue. She also works with business owners on tax, business, and estate planning issues in Oregon or Southwest Washington.

Special thanks to guest SYK co-author Nicholas Rogers. Nicholas is a 3L and 2019 J.D. candidate at Lewis & Clark Law School.

Happy Birthday! Who sang it? Better Question – Who owns it?

In breaking news – A California Federal Judge has ruled that over the past 80 years, none of the companies who have claimed to have a valid copyright claim to the popular “Happy Birthday to You” song actually do.  The current purported holder of the copyright, Warner/Chapell (an affiliate of Warner Music) has been collecting between $1,500 and $5,000 per use (or about $2 million per year).  Predictably, plaintiff’s lawyers are now looking into bringing a class action litigation to recover royalties paid for the use of “Happy Birthday to You”  since 1988.

For more information, please see today’s Los Angeles Times article.

Individual Kicker Credit Amounts Announced for Oregon

On August 26th, state economists announced that taxpayers will be getting a kicker rebate for the first time in eight years.  This is Oregon’s unique system of refunding taxes paid when general fund revenue exceeds 2% of projections.  For this period, revenue exceeded estimates by $111 million so folks who paid taxes in 2014 will be seeing a credit on their 2015 tax returns.

The credit looks to be about 5.8% of individuals’ “Total Tax Before Credits” (line 31 on the Oregon form 40).  To figure out what your kicker credit will look like, the Oregonian has set up a webpage to help calculate 5.8% or estimate if you don’t have access to your tax return.

Although the state used to send out checks, the cost of mailing was deemed prohibitively high, so the 2011 legislature changed the program to a refundable tax credit.

Is Picasso Coming to Portland?

On Monday, May 11, 2015 Pablo Picasso’s oil painting, “Women of Algiers (Version O)” sold for an astonishing, and record breaking, $179.4 million, inclusive of buyer’s premium, at Christy’s in New York.  This surpasses the paltry $142 million paid for the previous record holder “Three Studies of Lucien Freud,”  by Francis Bacon, which was loaned to the Portland Art Museum for public display over 15 weeks last year.  As with so many things in life, there is an interesting tax wrinkle here.

We wait with baited breath to see if the Portland Art Museum or some other Oregon museum announces a public viewing of this masterpiece.  Elaine Wynn’s decision to display Francis Bacon’s triptych for 105 days in Oregon is hardly surprising given the slightly over 8% sales tax rate at her home in Las Vegas, Nevada.  If the first use of the property occurred in Las Vegas, the tab would have been north of $11 million.  However, Nevada (like many states that have a sales tax) considers that tangible personal property like a painting) is not taxable in Nevada if the property is first used outside of Nevada.  Many states will say that there is a presumption that the first use occurs in their jurisdiction if the property comes into the state within 90 days after the sale takes place.  So, if the first use occurs in Oregon, no sales tax may be incurred. In many respects, this is a win-win for the public and for the collector.  The viewing public gets to see some of the most expensive works of art sold at auction and the buyers get to take advantage of a sales tax break. 

Sales tax at the relatively standard rate of 8% on $179 million would be closer to $14.3 million in sales tax revenue.  Hopefully that’s enough to motivate the anonymous buyer to let it hang in Portland for a few months.