Oregon Health Authority Orders New Statewide Face Covering Guidance

As COVID-19 continues to impact our daily lives, Governor Kate Brown has authorized the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to create new guidance on masks, face coverings and face shields (collectively referred to as “face coverings”). On August 13, 2020, masks, face shields, and face coverings became required statewide for offices and indoor public spaces and in outdoor public spaces when physical distancing is not possible.

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Family First Law & What It Means

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Family First Coronavirus Response Act, which provides, among other benefits, emergency paid sick leave and emergency family medical leave to employees affected by COVID-19.

There are many facets of the emergency law with complex details. Below is a brief overview of the major changes that many employers must consider during the COVID-19 pandemic. We encourage you to contact an attorney for more details regarding the requirements specific to your situation.

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A Letter to our Clients: COVID-19

To our clients,
As we all continue to closely monitor the Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, we wanted to share the proactive steps we, as a firm, are taking to ensure the health and safety of our clients, professionals, staff, families, and community. While we are following the rapidly changing health related guidelines and recommendations to help mitigate the Coronavirus’ impact, we are committed to offering the best legal representation to our clients, in the most health conscious way possible.

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No Questions Asked: Oregon’s Equal Pay Act

On May 22, 2017, the House unanimously re-passed House Bill 2005. The legislation, which is more commonly known as the Equal Pay Act of 2017, was amended by the Senate last week, and is now headed to Governor Brown for her signature.

While the majority of the media attention has been on the provisions in the bill that will prohibit discrimination against women in the payment of wages, there are other provisions affecting employment practices that employers should be aware of.

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“Not So Fast” – Federal Judge Grants Injunction Against Overtime Regulation

On Tuesday, November 22, a Federal District Court Judge in Texas granted a nationwide preliminary injunction against an Obama administration regulation, which sought to expand the eligibility of millions of workers for overtime pay.

The regulation was ruled by Judge Mazzat to have likely exceeded the authority of the Obama administration because it nearly doubled the overtime salary threshold. The regulation would raise the minimum annual salary amount from $23,660 to $47,476. It would automatically qualify workers for overtime pay, so long as their annual salary was below the new $47,476 threshold.

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Sick Time Ordinance Goes Into Effect

As of January 1, 2014 employers in the City of Portland are required to provide sick-time for their employees. Employers with 6 or more employees are required to provide 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours an employee works. Employees with 6 or fewer people are required to provide the same amount […]

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Employers Must Provide Notice on Health Insurance Marketplace by October 1, 2013

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA” sometimes referred to as Obamacare) creates a number of new requirements for employers. Recently, the Internal Revenue Service and Department of Labor announced that some of these requirements will be delayed until 2014 or 2015 to give employers, and the government, more time to ensure a smooth […]

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